Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
20 avril 2011 3 20 /04 /avril /2011 22:39

source : http://www.time.com/time/europe/

 

This issue coverSimone de Beauvoir

For better and for worse, she set the agenda for the feminist movement

By NAOMI WOLF - Tuesday, Oct. 31, 2006

 

In the popular imagination, Simone de Beauvoir is best known as the foremother of contemporary feminism, and as the turbaned, chain-smoking, glamorously intellectual companion of Jean-Paul Sartre. Born in 1908, she rejected religion and conformity in her teens, and then turned to philosophy, becoming a professor in 1929. But after 20 years she realized what many women intellectuals have realized since — before she could really know what she thought, she had to examine what it was to "become a woman." She had to understand what had happened to her brilliant mind simply by virtue of its being housed in a female body, in a culture in which to be female was to be second best.

Her landmark book The Second Sex — published in 1949, later translated into at least a dozen languages and, by the time of her death in 1986, selling more than a million copies in the U.S. alone — defines who we are as feminists today. This is for better and for worse. In her massive book, De Beauvoir described marriage as an "obscene bourgeois institution," and set up the opposition of freedom and duty that would come to characterize the sexual revolution. This opposition is so entrenched in the West that we scarcely notice it is nowhere written in stone.

It was De Beauvoir who positioned Western feminism in general as being a discourse of revolutionary freedom and autonomy — leading to 30 years of constructing women's emancipation as being about choice and liberation, about the right to be as promiscuous as men if we chose, or to change from mother to worker with a shake of our hair.

It is only now that leaders of movements that descend from the Western liberal tradition — in which autonomy is everything — are looking at more communitarian cultures and wondering what we may have missed. Only now, with our saturation in De Beauvoir's freedom, are we realizing that it is nicer to live and die surrounded by loved ones — as much fun as the sexual revolution and all that self-directedness has been. But every movement needs a birth and an adolescence, and without the drastic example of The Second Sex we would not have grown up as women. You have to really be free to truly choose connection. That is Simone de Beauvoir's gift to us.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
10 avril 2011 7 10 /04 /avril /2011 16:01

source : http://www.1902encyclopedia.com

 

The above article was written by George Croom Robertson, M.A., Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic at University College, London, 1867-92; first editor of Mind; his articles have been republished under the title of Philosophical Remains.

Peter Abelard
(Pierre Abélard)
French theologian and philosopher
(1079-1142)



PETER ABELARD, born at Pallet (Palais), not far from Nantes, in 1079, was the eldest son of the noble Breton house. The name Abaelardus (also written Abailardus, Abaielardus, and in many other ways) is said to be a corruption of Habelardus, substituted by himself for a nickname Bajolardus given to him while a student. As a boy, he showed an extraordinary quickness of apprehension, and, choosing a learned life instead of the active career natural to a youth of his birth, early became an adept in the art of dialectic, under which name philosophy, meaning at that time chiefly the logic of Aristotle transmitted through Latin channels, was the great subject of liberal study in the episcopal schools. Roscellin, the famous canon of Compiègne, is mentioned by himself as his teacher; but whether he heard this champion of extreme Nominalism in early youth, when he wandered about from school to school for instruction and exercise, or some years later, after he had already begun to teach for himself, remains uncertain. His wanderings finally brought him to Paris, still under the age of twenty. There, in the great cathedral school of Notre-Dame, he sat for a while under the teaching of William of Champeaux, the disciple of St Anselm and most advanced of Realists, but presently stepping forward, he overcame the master in discussion, and thus began a long duel that issued in the downfall of the philosophic theory of Realism, till then dominant in the early Middle Ages. First, in the teeth of opposition from the metropolitan teacher, he proceeded to set up a school of his own at Melun, whence, for more direct competition, he removed to Corbeil, nearer Paris. The success of his teaching was signal, though for a time he had to quit the field, the strain proving too great for his physical strength. On his return, after 1108, he found William lecturing no longer at Notre-Dame, but in a monastic retreat outside the city, and this battle was again joined between them. Forcing upon the Realists a material change of doctrine, he was once more victorious, and thenceforth he stood supreme. His discomforted rival still had power to keep him from lecturing in Paris, but soon failed in this last effort also. From Melun, where he had resumed teaching, Abelard passed to the capital, and set up his school on the heights on St Geneviève, looking over Notre-Dame. When he had increased his distinctions still further by winning reputation in the theological school of Anselm of Laon, no other conquest remained for him. He stepped into the chair of Notre-Dame, being also nominated canon, about the year 1115.

Abelard and Heloise painting

Abelard and Heloise surprised by Master Fulbert

(Painting by Jean Vignaud)


Few teachers ever held such sway as Abelard now did for a time. Distinguished in figure and manners, he was seen surrounded by crowds -- it is said thousands -- of students, drawn from all countries by the fame of his teaching, in which acuteness of thought was relieved by simplicity and grace of exposition. Enriched by the offerings of his pupils, and feasted with universal admiration, he came, as he says, to think himself the only philosopher standing the world. But a change in his fortunes was at hand. In his devotion to science, he had hitherto lived a very regular life, varied only by the excitement of conflict: now, at the height of his fame, other passions began to stir within him. There lived at that time, within the precinct of Notre-Dame, under the care of her uncle, the canon Fulbert, a young girl named Heloise, of noble extraction and born about 1101. Fair, but still more remarkable for her knowledge, which extended beyond Latin, it is said, to Greek and Hebrew, she awoke a feeling of love in the breast of Abelard; and with intent to win her, he sought and gained a footing in Fulbert's house as a regular inmate. Becoming also tutor to the maiden, he used the unlimited power which he thus obtained over her for the purpose of seduction, though not without cherishing a real affection which she returned in unparalleled devotion. Their relation interfering with his public work, and being, moreover, ostentatiously sung by himself, soon became known to all the world except the too-confiding Fulbert; and, when at last it could not escape even his vision, they were separated only to meet in secret. Thereupon Heloise found herself pregnant, and was carried off by her lover to Brittany, where she gave birth to a son. To appease her furious uncle, Abelard now proposed a marriage, under the condition that it should be kept secret, in order not to mar his prospects of advancement in the church; but of marriage, whether public or secret, Heloise would hear nothing. She appealed to him not to sacrifice for her the independence of his life, nor did she finally yield to the arrangement without the darkest forebodings, only too soon to be realised. The secret of the marriage was not kept by Fulbert; and when Heloise, true to her singular purpose, boldly then denied it, life was made so unsupportable to her that she sought refuge in the convent of Argenteuil. Immediately Fulbert, believing that her husband, who aided in the flight, designed to be rid of her, conceived a dire revenge. He and some others broke into Aberlard's chamber by night, and, taking him defenseless, perpetrated on him the most brutal mutilation. Thus cast down from his pinnacle of greatness into an abyss of shame and mystery, there was left to the brilliant master only the life of a monk. Heloise, not yet twenty, consumated her work of self-sacrifice at the call of his jealous love and took the veil.

It was in the abbey of St Denis that Abelard now aged forty, sought to bury himself with his woes out of sight. Finding, however, in the cloister neither calm nor solitude, and having gradually turned again to study, he yielded after a year to urgent entreaties from without and within, and went forth to reopen his school at the Priory of Maisoncelle (1120). His lectures, now framed in a devotional spirit, were heard again by crowds of students, and all his old influence seemed to have returned; but old emnities were revived also, against which he was no longer able as before to make head. No sooner had he put in writing his theological lectures (apparently the Introductio ad Theologiam that has come down to us) than his adversaries fell foul of his rataionalistic interpretation of the Trinitarian dogma. Charging him with the heresy of Sabelhius in a provincial synod held at Soissons in 1121, they procured by irregular practices a condemnation of his teaching, whereby he was made to throw his book into the flames and then was shut up in the convent of St Médard at Soissons. After the other, it was the bitterest possible experience that could befall him, nor, in the state of mental desolation into which it plunged him, could he find any comfort from being soon again set free. The life in his own monastery proved no more congenial than formerly, he fled from it in secret, and only awaited for permission to live away from St Denis before he chose the one lot that suited his present mood. In a desert place near Nogent-sur-Seine, he built himself a cabin of stubble and reeds, and turned hermit. But there fortune came back to him with a new surprise. His retreat becoming known, students flocked from Paris, and covered the wilderness around him with their tents and huts. When he began to teach again he found consolation, and in gratitude he consecrated the new oratory they built for him by the name of the Paraclete.

Upon the return of new dangers, or at least of fears, Abelard left the Paraclete to make trial of another refuge, accepting an invitation to preside over the Abbey of St Gildas-de-Thuys, on the far-off shore of Lower Brittany. It proved a wretched exchange. The region was inhospitable, the domain a prey to lawless exaction, the house itself savage and disorderly. Yet for nearly ten years he continued to struggle with fate before he fled from his charge, yielding in the end only under peril of violent death. The misery of those years was not, however, unrelieved; for he had been able, on the breaking-upof Heloise's convent at Argenteuil, to establish her as head of a new religious house at the deserted Paraclete, and in the capacity of spiritual director he often was called to revisit the spot thus made doubly dear to him. All this time Heloise had lived amid universal esteem for her knowledge and character, uttering no word under the doom that had fallen upon her youth; but now, at last, the occasion came for expressing all the pent-up emotions of her soul. Living on for some time in Brittany after his flight from St Gildas, Abelard wrote, among other things, his famous Historia Calamitatum, and thus moved her to pen her first Letter, which remains an unsurpassed utterance of human passion and womanly devotion; the first being followed by the two other Letters, in which she finally accepted the part of resignation which, now as a brother to a sister, Abelard commended to her. He not long after was seen once more upon the field of his early triumphs, lecturing on Mount St Geneviève in 1136 (when he was heard by John of Salisbury), but it was only for a brief space: no new triumph, but a last great trial, awaited him in the few years to come of his chequered life. As far back as the Paraclete days, he had counted as chief among his foes Bernard of Clairvaux, in whom was incarnated the principle of fervent and unhesitating faith, from which rational inquiry like his was hseer revolt, and now this uncompromising spirit was moving, at the instance of others, to crush the growing evil in the person of the boldest offender. After preliminary negotiations, in which Bernard was roused by Abelard's steadfastness to put forth all his strength, a council met at Sens, before which Abelard, formallyarraigned upon a number of heretical charges, was prepared to plead his cause. When, however, Bernard, not without foregone terror in the prospect of meeting the redoubtable dialectician, had opened the case, suddenly Abelard appealed to Rome. The stroke availed him nothing; for Bernard, who had power, notwithstanding, to get a condemnation passed at the council, did not rest a moment till a second condemnation was procured at Rome in the following year. Meanwhile, on his way thither to urge his plea in person, Abelard had broken down at the abbey of Cluni, and there, an utterly fallen man, with spirit of the humblest, and only not bereft of his intellectual force, he lingered but a few months before the approach of death. Removed by friendly hands, for the relief of his sufferings, to the Priory of St Marcel, he died on the 21st of April 1142. first buried at St Marcel, his remains soon after were carried off in secrecy to the Paraclete, and given over to the loving care of Heloise, who in time came herself to rest beside them. The bones of the pair were shifted more than once afterwards, but they were marvelously preserved even through the vicissitudes of the French revolution, and now they lie united in the well-known tomb at Père-Lachaise.

Tomb of Heloise and Abelard, Paris image

Tomb of Heloise and Abelard
in Père Lachaise Cemetery, Paris, France



Great as was the influence exerted by Abelard on the minds of hiscontemporaries and the course of mediaeval thought, he has been little known in modern times but for his connection with Heloise. Indeed, it was not till the present century, when Cousin in 1836 issued the collection entitled Ouvrages ineduts d'Abelard, that his philosophical performance could be judged a first hand; of his strictly philosophical works only one, the ethical treatise Scito te ipsum, having been published earlier, namely, in 1721. Cousin's collection, besides giving extracts from the theological work Sic et Non (an assemblage of opposite opinions on doctrinal points, culled from the Fathers as a basis for discussion), includes the Dialectica, commentaries on logical works of Aristotle, Porphyry, and Boethius, and a fragment, De Generibus et Speciebus. The last-named work, and also the psychological treatise De Intellectibus, published apart by Cousin (in Fragmens Philosophiques, vol. ii), are now considered upon internal evidence not to be by Abelard himself, but only to have sprung out of his school. A genuine work, the Glossuloe super Porphyrium, from which M. de Remusat, in his classical monograph Abelard (1845), has given extracts, remains in manuscript.

The general importance of Abelard lies in his having fixed more decisively than any one before him the scholastic manner of philosophizing, with its object of giving a formally rational expression to the received ecclesiastical doctrine. However his own particular interpretations may have been condemned, they were conceived in essentially the same spirit as the general scheme of thought afterwards elaborated in the 13th century with approval from the heads of the church. Through him was prepared in the Middle Age the ascendancy of the philosophical authority of Aristotle, which became firmly established in the half-century after his death, when first the completed Organon, and gradually all the other works of the Greek thinker, came to be known in the schools: before his time it was rather upon the authority of Plato that the prevailing Realism sought to lean. As regards the central question of Universals, without having sufficient knowledge of Aristotle's view , Abelard yet, in taking middle ground between the extravagant Realism of his master, William of Champeaux, or of St Anselm, and the not less extravagant Nominalism (as we have it reported) of his other master, Roscellin, touched at more than one point the Aristotelian position. Along with Aristotle, also with Nominalists generally, he ascribed full reality only to the particular concretes; while, in opposition to the "insane sentential" of Roscellin, he declared the Universal to be no mere word (vox), but to consist, or (perhaps we may say) emerge, in the fact of predication (sermo). Lying in the middle between realism and (extreme) Nominalism, this doctrine has often been spoken of as Conceptualism, but ignorantly so. Abelard, preeminently a logician, did not concern himself with the psychological question which the conceptualist aims at deciding as to the mental subsistence of the Universal. Outside of his dialectic, it was in ethics that Abelard showed greatest activity of pohilosophical thought; laying very particular stress upon the subjective intention as determining, if not the moral character, at least the moral value, of human action. His thought in this direction, wherein he anticipated something of modern speculation, is the more remarkable because his scholastic successors accomplished least in the field of morals, hardly venturing to bring the principles and rules of conduct under pure philosophical discussion, even after the great ethical inquiries of Aristotle became fully known to them. (G. C. R)

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original



 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 17:02

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

Premier grand philosophe français, Michel Eyquem, seigneur de Montaigne, est issu d'une famille de petite noblesse du Périgord. Parmi ses aïeux figurent des juifs chassés du Portugal.

Élevé avec une attention exceptionnelle par un père humaniste, il est réveillé chaque matin en musique et apprend le latin comme langue maternelle, ne découvrant le français (et le patois gascon de sa région) qu'à 7 ans.

Il a la douleur de perdre en 1563 son grand ami Étienne de la Boétie, auteur d'un opuscule politique audacieux sur la démocratie et la liberté : le Discours de la servitude volontaire ou Contr'Un.

S'étant pris de passion pour l'opuscule, Montaigne avait rencontré son jeune auteur au parlement de Bordeaux en 1557 et leur amitié n'avait dès lors cessé de croître. Un peu plus tard meurt son père...

 

Après avoir été conseiller à la cour des aides de Périgueux et au parlement de Bordeaux, Montaigne estime, à 37 ans, en 1571, être suffisamment avancé en âge pour préparer sa mort en philosophant comme savaient le faire les grands penseurs de l'Antiquité ; la matière de sa réflexion étant sa propre vie («Que sais-je ?»).

Son œuvre maîtresse, Les Essais, va naître de manière éclatante de ce projet. C'est en référence à elle que nous donnons depuis lors le nom d'«essai» à tout ouvrage de réflexion.

 

Homme d'action autant que sage

Montaignel va se consacrer pendant dix ans à l'écriture dans l'une des tours de son château (sa «librairie») tandis que la France, autour de lui, gémit dans les guerres de religion. Mais il sera interdit au penseur de s'isoler autant qu'il l'aurait souhaité... Sa réputation de sagesse est telle, dans les hautes sphères de la société, que le roi Charles IX fait appel à lui comme gentilhomme ordinaire de la Chambre. Dès 1572, l'année de la Saint-Barthélemy, il doit rejoindre le duc de Montpensier, général de l'armée royale et lui sert d'intermédiaireauprès du parlement.

En 1574, il se retire dans son château pour se soigner car il souffre de la maladie de la pierre, une grave maladie des reins. Après la première édition des Essais, le 1er mars 1580, à Bordeaux, Montaigne entreprend un grand périple en Allemagne, Suisse et en Italie, dans l'espoir de soigner ses calculs rénaux par le biais d'eaux thermales.

À Rome, où il s'attarde pas moins de six mois, il apprend sa nomination à la mairie de Bordeaux, fonction qu'il va assumer avec sérieux durant deux mandats tout en peaufinant les nouvelles éditions des Essais où se révèle sa pensée, certes sceptique, mais empreinte de tolérance et d'ouverture («Je suis du monde»).

La Guyenne, province dont la capitale est Bordeaux, se voit placée sous le gouvernement d'Henri III de Navarre, futur Henri IV. Celui-ci, bien que chef du clan protestant, fait de Montaigne, catholique sincère, l'un de ses conseillers. Le sage est désigné à plusieurs reprises comme négociateur entre le gouverneur et son cousin, le roi de France Henri III.

En 1584, la mort du jeune frère d'Henri III fait d'Henri de Navarre l'héritier légitime du roi de France. Les chefs catholiques ne supportant pas la perspective d'un roi protestant, voilà qu'éclate la «guerre des trois Henri», le troisième étant le duc Henri de Guise. À la Noël 1584, alors qu'il est traqué par les armées ennemies, Henri de Navarre s'héberge avec quelques hommes chez Montaigne. Il y reviendra dans de meilleures conditions en octobre 1587, après sa victoire de Coutras et la messe de Libourne en hommage aux défunts.

Montaigne ne se contente pas de dialoguer avec les chefs de guerre. Il noue aussi une relation d'amitié avec la très cultivée Diane d'Andoins, qui le reçoit dans son château d'Hagetmau et qu'il surnomme la «Grande Corisande». Diane reste avant tout connue comme le premier grand amour d'Henri de Navarre, le «Vert-Galant».

Le 13 septembre 1592, Michel Eyquem de Montaigne s'éteint dans la chapelle privée qui jouxte sa fameuse «librairie», dans le vignoble bordelais. Il a 60 ans et laisse le souvenir d'un honnête homme, d'un penseur tolérant et d'un virtuose de la langue française en un siècle où ces qualités sont parcimonieusement distribuées... Avec Montaigne, l'intelligence a acquis un style.....

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 16:57

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

Guillaume Budé26 janvier 1467 à Paris - 22 août 1540 à Paris

 

nullGuillaume Budé, plus grand humaniste français, est écrivain mais aussi bibliothécaire et imprimeur. Il s'énorgueillit d'avoir «rouvert les sépulcres del'Antiquité». C'est la définition même de l'humanisme.

En 1522, le roi François 1er le nomme à la tête de sa bibliothèque de Fontainebleau, à l'origine de la Bibliothèque nationale. À l'initiative de Guillaume Budé, le roi instaure en 1536 le dépôt légal qui fait obligation aux imprimeurs de déposer un exemplaire de chaque livre à la Bibliothèque royale ; un habile moyen d'enrichir celle-ci.

Guillaume Budé suggère aussi à François 1er la fondation d'un Collège des Trois-Langues (latin, grec, hébreu) ou Collège des lecteurs royaux, dans lequel des érudits viendraient enseigner gratuitement à tous les publics. François 1er le fonde en 1530 sous le nom de Collège royal. C'est aujourd'hui le Collège de France.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
27 mars 2011 7 27 /03 /mars /2011 16:03

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

Claude-Henri de Saint-Simon. 17 octobre 1760 à Paris - 19 mai 1825 à Paris

 

Héritier des Lumières et de Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Claude-Henri de Rouvroy, comte de Saint-Simon, compte parmi les grands utopistes du XIXe siècle. Petit-cousin du mémorialiste de Louis XIV, il s'enrichit en spéculant sur les biens nationaux puis sombre dans le dénuement.

À travers de nombreux ouvrages, dont Le Nouveau Christianisme (1825), il se présente comme le prophète d'une nouvelle religion fondée sur la fraternité et la foi dans le progrès et l'industrie. Dans le premier numéro de sa revue L'Organisateur (1819), il publie une célèbre parabole, dans laquelle il oppose l'utilité sociale des producteurs et des savants à l'inutilité des dirigeants politiques, religieux et militaires...

Le saint-simonisme va exercer une influence profonde sur l'élite française du Second Empire. Il séduit l'historien Augustin Thierry et le philosophe Auguste Comte, fondateur du positivisme (tous les deux furent les secrétaires de Saint-Simon), les banquiers Jacob et Isaac Pereire, qui organisent le crédit en France, le polytechnicien Michel Chevalier, rédacteur du traité de libre-échange de 1860, Prosper Enfantin, un autre polytechnicien, qui convainc le diplomate Ferdinand de Lesseps de l'intérêt ducanal de Suez, etc.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
27 mars 2011 7 27 /03 /mars /2011 16:00

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

Charles-Louis de Montesquieu. 18 janvier 1689 à La Brède (Guyenne, France) - 10 février 1755 à Paris

 

Né au château de La Brède, non loin de Bordeaux, Montesquieu se signale très tôt par une critique spirituelle de la société française sous la Régence du duc d'Orléans : les Lettres persanes (1721). Auteur à succès, il fait le tour de l'Europe avant de se retirer à la Brède pour écrire, ou plutôt dicter, son chef-d’œuvre, L'Esprit des Lois (1748).

L'auteur recommande de confier les pouvoirs législatif (la rédaction des lois), exécutif (l'exécution des lois) et judiciaire à des organes distincts les uns des autres. S'inspirant du modèle anglais et du philosophe John Locke, il propose par ailleurs de diviser le pouvoir législatif entre deux assemblées, l’une qui crée la loi, l’autre (Sénat, chambre «haute» ou chambre des Lords) qui la corrige.

Ces principes de distribution des pouvoirs sont à l'origine de nos constitutions politiques. Mais leur inventeur doutait qu'ils puissent fonctionner dans de très grands États, comme c'est pourtant le cas aujourd'hui !

Montesquieu est l’un des fondateurs des sciences politiques modernes avec les Anglais Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) et John Locke (1632-1704). Le premier, auteur de Léviathan et de la célèbre sentence : «L’homme est un loup pour l’homme», s’est fait l’apologue de l’absolutisme ; le second, auteur d’un Traité du gouvernement civil, est à l’origine de la pensée libérale.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
27 mars 2011 7 27 /03 /mars /2011 15:05

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

L'écrivain Alexis de Tocqueville s'éteint le 16 avril 1859, à 54 ans. Descendant d'une famille de l'aristocratie normande, il est l'un des principaux penseurs modernes, dans la continuité de Montesquieu.

Mieux et plus tôt que quiconque, il a entrevu la naissance des démocraties modernes et les dangers qui les menacent. Son oeuvre demeure vivante et mérite d'être lue et savourée par tous les amateurs de belle prose et de grandes idées.

André Larané.

 

Aristocrate de coeur, démocrate de raison

Alexis de Tocqueville naît à Paris, le 29 juillet 1805, dans la famille d'un comte qui sera préfet sous la Restauration, après la chute de Napoléon 1er, et finalement élevé à la dignité de pair de France.

Alexis est par sa mère l'arrière-petit-fils de Malesherbes, un magistrat qui paya de sa vie l'honneur d'avoir défendu Louis XVI (et sa bienveillance à l'égard des philosophes et des contestataires de l'Ancien Régime). Il effectue des études de droit qui l'orientent vers la magistrature et débute sa carrière en 1827 comme juge auditeur au tribunal de Versailles.

Journaliste de terrain et penseur

Au lendemain des Trois Glorieuses de 1830, Alexis de Tocqueville prête serment non sans réticences au roi Louis-Philippe 1er. Il souhaite prendre du champ avec la politique française. C'est ainsi qu'il part aux États-Unis avec son ami Gustave de Beaumont pour un voyage d'études sur le système pénitentiaire.

Les deux hommes s'embarquent au Havre le 2 avril 1831 et arrivent à New York le 11 mai suivant. Ils parcourent l'est du pays, jusqu'aux Grands Lacs, manquent de périr dans un naufrage sur l'Ohio, sont prisonniers des glaces sur le Mississipi et, après un passage à la Nouvelle-Orléans le 1er janvier 1832, sont reçus par le président Andrew Jackson en personne à Washington.

Ils regagnent la France le 20 février 1832. C'est plus tôt que prévu, l'aristocratique Alexis de Tocqueville n'appréciant que modérément les moeurs rugueuses des Américains.

L'année suivante, après avoir démissionné de la magistrature pour raisons politiques, Alexis de Tocqueville séjourne brièvement en Angleterre où il complète ses informations sur les systèmes démocratiques.

De ses notes de voyage, il tire la matière de son premier ouvrage, La démocratie en Amérique, dont le premier tome est publié le 23 janvier 1835. Le style est élégant et le contenu un régal pour l'esprit. Le succès est immédiat. La publication du deuxième tome, en avril 1840, vaut à son auteur d'être élu à l'Académie française (25 décembre 1841). Il en est l'un des plus jeunes membres.

 

Les ressorts de la démocratie moderne

Le premier tome de La démocratie en Amérique traite plus particulièrement de l'Amérique pionnière du président Andrew Jackson. Dans le deuxième tome, l'auteur élargit audacieusement son propos au phénomène démocratique et à son avenir probable.

Alexis de Tocqueville montre que l'État de droit et les libertés individuelles sont les moteurs indispensables du progrès économique et social. «Je ne sais si l'on peut citer un seul peuple manufacturier et commerçant, depuis les Tyriens jusqu'aux Florentins et aux Anglais, qui n'ait été un peuple libre. Il y a donc un lien étroit et un rapport nécessaire entre ces deux choses : liberté et industrie... La liberté est donc particulièrement utile à la production des richesses. On peut voir au contraire que le despotisme lui est particulièrement ennemi», observe-t-il.

Il craint toutefois que le mouvement démocratique et l'individualisme ne conduisent à terme à une atomisation de la société et ne débouchent sur l'avènement d'un État despotique.

Par l'acuité de ses vues, Alexis de Tocqueville figure parmi les écrivains français les plus connus aux États-Unis et c'est dans ce pays que se rencontrent encore aujourd'hui les meilleurs spécialistes de son oeuvre. Parmi de multiples citations qui portent à la réflexion, on peut retenir celle-ci, qui résonne encore avec une singulière actualité : «Les nations de nos jours ne sauraient faire que dans leur sein les conditions ne soient pas égales ; mais il dépend d'elles que l'égalité les conduise à la servitude ou à la liberté, aux lumières ou à la barbarie, à la prospérité ou aux misères».

Ombre au tableau d'honneur : l'historien Emmanuel Todd note qu'Alexis de Tocqueville s'est fourvoyé dans son analyse en ignorant le rôle primordial de l'alphabétisation de masse dans l'émergence de la démocratie américaine !

 

Une brève carrière politique

Député sous Louis-Philippe, Tocqueville annonce à la tribune de l'assemblée, en janvier 1848, une explosion sociale que rien ne laisse paraître : «Regardez ce qui se passe au sein de ces classes ouvrières, qui, aujourd'hui, je le reconnais, sont tranquilles... ; mais ne voyez-vous pas que leurs passions, de politiques, sont devenues sociales ? »

Après l'abdication du roi en février 1848, Tocqueville participe à la commission qui rédige la Constitution de la IIe République. Le 2 juin 1849, il devient ministre des Affaires étrangères du gouvernement provisoire et doit immédiatement s'occuper de l'intervention des troupes françaises à Rome, dans le but de protéger le pape contre les assauts des nationalistes italiens. Il quitte le ministère dès le 31 octobre suivant. Son recueil de Souvenirs apporte un éclairage intéressant sur cette période troublée.

Dans L'Ancien Régime et la Révolution, son deuxième grand livre, Tocqueville analyse la Révolution française sous un jour nouveau : il montre que les révolutionnaires ont achevé la centralisation commencée sous Louis XIII et Louis XIV.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
27 mars 2011 7 27 /03 /mars /2011 15:01

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

Ernest Renan. 27 février 1823 à Tréguier - 2 octobre 1892 à Paris

 

Ernest Renan, issu d'une famille traditionnelle de Bretagne, perd la foi en suivant les cours du séminaire de Saint-Sulpice, à Paris.

Poursuivant des études de philosophie et de lettres, il élabore un système de pensée positiviste qu'il expose dans L'avenir de la science (1848) et dans son Histoire générale et système comparé des langues sémitiques (1855), un ouvrage aux relents antisémites. Renan fait aussi scandale en 1862 avec sa leçon inaugurale au Collège de France, au cours de laquelle il présente Jésus comme simplement un «homme incomparable». Il publie ensuite plusieurs ouvrages d'histoire religieuse qui lui valent une renommée sulfureuse, notamment une Vie de Jésus(1863).

Affecté par la défaite de 1870, Renan se rallie en 1877 à la IIIe République dont il devient avec Victor Hugo l'une des gloires tutélaires. Il se fait le chantre d'une France idéale et quelque peu irréelle, débarrassée de ses doutes et de ses conflits.

Sa personnalité originale combine une sensibilité de poète avec une rigueur de positiviste et un humour de philosophe. Il dénonce la vision qui a cours en Allemagne d'une nation fondée sur les liens du sang et de la langue. Lui-même présente la nation comme un «plébiscite de tous les jours» fondé sur le «culte des ancêtres», «la possession en commun d'un riche legs de souvenirs» et «la volonté de continuer à faire valoir l'héritage qu'on a reçu indivis». Les Français de son époque pouvaient se reconnaître dans cette définition.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
27 mars 2011 7 27 /03 /mars /2011 14:50

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

Fils d'un brasseur et tonnelier, Joseph Proudhon est le seul théoricien révolutionnaire du XIXe siècle issu du milieu populaire.

André Larané.
Un intellectuel issu du peuple

Ayant attiré l'attention d'un enseignant par sa soif d'apprendre, il est admis comme boursier au collège de Besançon, puis devient ouvrier typographe pour contribuer à nourrir ses parents. L'Académie de Besançon lui attribue un prix qui lui permet de passer son baccalauréat à 29 ans.

Proudhon publie en 1840 le mémoire : Qu'est-ce que la propriété ? ou Recherches sur le principe du droit et du gouvernement, qui affecte de traiter la propriété sous forme de spéculation académique. On en retient la fameuse formule «La propriété, c’est le vol» !

Passant en revue les différentes théories présentées jusqu'alors pour établir le droit de propriété, le jeune Proudhon les réfute l'une après l'autre, et conclut que la propriété est immorale, injuste, impossible !... Traîné devant la cour d'assises, il est cependant acquitté, les jurés n'ayant vraisemblablement pas conscience du caractère explosif du sujet.

Dès lors, Proudhon va poursuivre à Paris ses activités de journaliste, de théoricien de la révolution et d'activiste radical. Il établit un réseau de correspondants agitateurs (Grün, Bakounine, Herzen, Marx) et publie d'innombrables articles, manifestes, études sociales.

Confronté toute sa vie à des difficultés professionnelles, Proudhon milite contre le travail aliénant du capitalisme industriel naissant. Corrigeant sa pensée initiale, il dénonce principalement la propriété des outils de production et le fait que l'on puisse tirer un revenu de son capital sans être obligé de travailler. Il se montre par contre partisan de la propriété individuelle pour tous et exalte la cellule familiale, clé de voûte de la société.

Proudhon, confiant en la nature humaine, apparaît comme un lointain disciple de Jean Jacques Rousseau. Il souhaite protéger l'individu de toute sorte d’abus de pouvoir et en vient à s’opposer à la notion d’État pour proclamer la prépondérance de la liberté. Cela fait de lui le premier théoricien de l'anarchisme... et un adversaire majeur des socialistes et de Karl Marx.

 
L'insurgé

Le militant est élu en juin 1848 à l'Assemblée constituante de la IIe République. À la tribune de l'Assemblée, ce «pauvre fils de pauvre», comme il se définit lui-même, plaide avec vigueur en faveur de la liberté et prend la défense des révoltés, ce qui lui vaut un blâme.

Le prince Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (le futur Napoléon III) devenant président de la République en décembre 1848, Proudhon s'oppose immédiatement à lui. Le voici envoyé pendant trois ans en prison pour «offense au Président de la République». Qu’importe, il profite de son séjour à la prison Sainte-Pélagie pour écrire tant et plus... et épouse une jeune ouvrière passementière. Après un deuxième séjour en prison, il s'exile en Belgique.

Sous le Second Empire, à Londres, en 1864, quelques mois avant sa mort, amnistié mais usé par les épreuves et le travail, Proudhon participe encore à la naissance de la 1ère Internationale socialiste avec (ou plutôt contre) Karl Marx.

 

 

L'année de sa mort, le peintre Gustave Courbet, qui fut son ami, réalise à partir de photos anciennes le portrait posthume ci-dessus, qui représente Joseph Proudhon en 1853, dans la pose très symbolique de l'ancien ouvrier typographe en blouse, dans une attitude pensive, entouré d’écrits et la plume à portée de la main, en compagnie de ses chères filles. Cet autodidacte n’a cessé en effet d’observer, de s’interroger et d’écrire...

Son oeuvre considérable fait de lui l'un des maîtres à penser de l'anarchisme, de l'autogestion, de la dialectique révolutionnaire et du fédéralisme. Son idéalisme inspirera également Jaurès et les socialistes français de même que les anarchistes russes, tel Boukanine, et même les promoteurs du fédéralisme européen...

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article
26 février 2011 6 26 /02 /février /2011 12:25

source : http://www.herodote.net

 

Le 10 février 1755 meurt à Paris Charles-Louis de Secondat, baron de La Brède et de Montesquieu. On peut le considérer comme le fondateur des sciences politiques modernes.

Un homme de réflexion

Charles-Louis Secondat, baron de Montesquieu (1689-1755)L'illustre écrivain est né 66 ans plus tôt, le 18 janvier 1689, au château de La Brède, non loin de Bordeaux.

Étudiant brillant, il hérite à 27 ans d'une charge de président au Parlement de Bordeaux. Il se signale très tôt à l'attention du public cultivé par un petit ouvrage: les Lettres persanes (1721). Il s'agit d'une critique spirituelle de la société française sous la Régence du duc d'Orléans.

Académicien et auteur à succès, il fait le tour de l'Europe avant de se retirer dans sa belle demeure de la Brède pour écrire, ou plutôt dicter, son chef-d'oeuvre, L'Esprit des Lois (1748). Dans cet ouvrage d'observation et de réflexion, Montesquieu tente d'expliquer par des facteurs objectifs les différences entre les sociétés et les systèmes de gouvernement : «J'ai d'abord examiné les hommes, et j'ai cru que, dans cette infinie diversité de lois et de coutumes, ils n'étaient pas uniquement conduits par leurs fantaisies», prévient-il sous forme de litote dans sa préface à L'Esprit des Lois).

L'auteur recommande de confier les pouvoirs législatif (la rédaction des lois), exécutif (l'exécution des lois) et judiciaire à des organes distincts les uns des autres.

– Il propose de confier le pouvoir judiciaire à des juges renouvelés à chaque procès.

– S'inspirant du modèle anglais et du philosophe John Locke, il propose par ailleurs de diviser le pouvoir législatif entre deux assemblées :
– une assemblée tirée des corps du peuple qui crée la loi (chambre «basse», chambre des députés ou Communes),
– une assemblée de nobles héréditaires qui corrige la loi (Sénat, chambre «haute» ou chambre des Lords à la manière anglaise).

Ces principes de distribution des pouvoirs sont à l'origine de nos constitutions politiques. Mais leur inventeur doutait qu'ils puissent fonctionner dans de très grands États, comme c'est pourtant le cas aujourd'hui !

L'idéal démocratique, selon Montesquieu, n'est en effet applicable qu'aux petites communautés et à la condition que l'autorité supérieure soit équilibrée par de puissants corps intermédiaires. Sur ce dernier point, Montesquieu annonce Tocqueville. Il a, comme ce dernier, la hantise des gouvernements despotiques, nous dirions aujourd'hui totalitaires.

Homme des Lumières et «philosophe», écrivain à l'esprit fin et souvent caustique, Montesquieu a publié de fort belles choses sur la condition humaine et les droits individuels. Il s'est ainsi montré sévère à propos de l'esclavage... même si, en sa qualité de riche parlementaire, il ne dédaignait pas de placer sa fortune dans les compagnies de commerce pratiquant le commerce triangulaire.....

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans PENSEURS ET PHILOSOPHES
commenter cet article

Présentation

  • : French Influence
  • : Cher visiteur (é)perdu, bienvenue sur le blog de French Influence. Il est question ici de la France et de son rapport au monde. Il est question de la France, pour l'amour du pays, par les yeux du monde
  • Contact