Overblog Suivre ce blog
Administration Créer mon blog
30 août 2011 2 30 /08 /août /2011 18:01

FERMETURE DU BLOG

 

Bonjour,

le blog déménage sur une nouvelle plateforme

retrouvez-le sur http://influencefrancaise.wordpress.com/ (en construction)

 

A bientôt

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
10 avril 2011 7 10 /04 /avril /2011 16:38

source : http://www.1902encyclopedia.com/

 

 

The above article was written by the Very Rev. John Tulloch, D.D., LL.D., Principal of St Mary's College, University of St. Andrews; author of Leaders of the Reformation, English Puritanism and its Leaders, Rational Theology and Christian Philosophy in England in the Seventeenth Century, and Pascal; editor of Fraser's Magazine.

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux
French theologian and reformer
(1090-1153)

 

ST. BERNARD, one of the most illustrious Christian teachers and representatives of monasticism in the Middle Ages, was born at Fontaines, near Dijon, in Burgundy, in 1091. The son of a knight and vassal of the duke of Burgundy who perished in the first crusade, Bernard may have felt for a time the temptations of a military career, but the influence of a pious mother and his own inclinations towards a life of meditation and study led him to the cloister. While still a youth he is said to have been "marvellously cogitative" ("mire cogitativus," St Bern. Op., vol. ii. col. 1063), and the ascendancy of his mind and character were soon shown. He joined the small monastery of Citeaux in 1113 when twenty-two years of age, and such were the effects of his own devotion and eloquent enthusiasm in commending a religious life, that he drew after him not only his two younger brothers, but also his two elder ones, Guido and Gerard, both of whom had naturally taken to soldiering, and the elder of whom was married and had children. The effect of his preaching is said to have been that " mothers hid their sons, wives their husbands, companions their friends," lest they should be drawn away by his persuasive earnestness.

 

St Bernard of Clairvaux image

Bernard of Clairvaux
as depicted in a medieval illuminated manuscript
(Note: initial letter B for Bernard)



The monastery of Citeaux had attracted St Bernard not only on account of its neighbourhood (it was only a few miles distant from Dijon), but by its reputation for austerity. The monks were few and very poor. They were under an Englishman of the name of Stephen Harding, originally from Dorsetshire, whose aim was to restore the Benedictine rule to its original simplicity and give a new impulse to the monastic movement. In Bernard, Harding found a congenial spirit. No amount of self-mortification could exceed his ambition. He strove to overcome his bodily senses altogether and to live entirely absorbed in religious meditation. Sleep he counted a loss, and compared it to death. Food was only taken to keep him from fainting. The most menial offices were his delight, and even then his humility looked around for some lowlier employment. Fortunately he loved nature, and found a constant solace in her rocks and woods. "Trust one who has tried it," he writes in one of his epistles, "you will find more in woods than in books; trees and stones will teach you what you can never learn from masters." ("Expertocrede: aliquid amplius invenies in silvis quam in libris; ligna et lapides docebunt te quod a magistris audire non possis," Epist. 106.)

So ardent a nature soon found a sphere of ambition for itself. The monks of Citeaux, from being a poor and unknown company, began to attract attention after the accession of St Bernard and his friends. The fame of their self-denial was noised abroad, and out of their lowliness and abnegation came as usual distinction and success. The small monastery was unable to contain the inmates that gathered within it, and it began to send forth colonies in various directions. St Bernard had been two years an inmate, and the penetrating eye of the abbot had discovered beneath all his spiritual devotion a genius of rare power, and especially fitted to aid his measures of monastic reform. He was chosen accordingly to head a band of devotees who issued from Citeaux in 1115 in search of a new home. This band, with Bernard at their head, journeyed northwards till they reached a spot in the diocese of Langres--a thick-wooded valley, wild and gloomy, but with a clear stream running through it. Here they settled and laid the foundations of the famous abbey of Clairvaux, with which St Bernard's name remains associated in history The hardships which the monks endured for a time in the new abode were such as to drive them almost to despair, and their leader fell seriously ill, and was only rescued from what seemed impending death by the kind compulsion of his friend William of Champeaux, the great doctor of the age, who besought and received the direction of Bernard for a year from his superior at Citeaux. Thanks to his considerate friend the abbot of Clairvaux was forced to abandon the cares of his new establishment, and in retirement and a healthful regimen to seek renewed health . The effect was all that could be desired, and in a few years Bernard had not only recovered his strength, but had begun that marvellous career of literary and ecclesiastical activity, of incessant correspondence and preaching which was to make him in some respects the most influential man of his age.

Gradually the influence of Bernard's character began to extend beyond his monastery. His friendship with William of Champeaux and others gave currency to his opinions, and from his simple retreat came by voice or pen an authority before which many bowed, not only within his own order but within the church at large. This influence was notably shown after the death of Pope Honorius II. in 1130. Two rival popes assumed the purple, each being able to appeal to his election by a section of the cardinals. Christendom was divided betwixt the claims of Anacletus II. and Innocent II. The former was backed by a strong Italian party, and drove his adversary from Rome and even from Italy. Innocent took refuge in France. The king, Louis the Fat, espoused his cause, and having summoned a council of archbishops and bishops, he laid his commands on the holy abbot of Clairvaux to be present also and give the benefit of his advice. With reluctance Bernard obeyed the call, and from the depths of seclusion was at once plunged into the heart of the great contest which was afflicting the Christian world. The king and prelates put the question before him in such a way as to invite his decision and make him arbiter. After careful deliberation he gave his judgment in favour of Innocent and not only so, but from that time forward threw himself with characteristic fervour and force into the cause for which he had declared. Not only France, but, England, Spain, and Germany were won to the side of Innocent, who, banished from Rome, in the words of St Bernard, was "accepted by the world." He travelled from place to place with the powerful abbot by his side, who also received him in his humble cell at Clairvaux. Apparently, however, the meanness of the accommodation and the scantiness of the fare (one small fowl was all that could be got for the Pope's repast), left no wish on the part of Innocent or his retinue to continue their stay at Clairvaux. He found a more dainty reception elsewhere, but nowhere so powerful a friend. Through the persuasions of Bernard, the emperor took up arms for Innocent; and Anacletus was driven to shut himself up in the impregnable castle of St Angelo, where his death opened the prospect of a united Christendom. A second anti-pope was elected, but after a few months retired from the field, owing also, it is said, to St Bernard's influence. A great triumph was gained not without a struggle, and the abbot of Clairvaux remained master of the ecclesiastical situation. No name stood higher in the Christian world.

The chief events which fill up his subsequent life attest the greatness of his influence. These were his contest with the famous Abelard, and his preaching of the second crusade.

Peter Abelard was twelve years older than Bernard, and had risen to eminence before Bernard had entered the gates of Citeaux. His first intellectual encounter had been with Bernard's aged friend William of Champeaux, whom he had driven from his scholastic throne at Paris by the superiority of his dialectics. His subsequent career, his ill-fated passion for Heloise, his misfortunes, his intellectual restlessness and audacity, his supposed heresies, had all shed additional renown on his name; and when a council was summmoned at Sens in 1140, at which the French king and his nobles and all the prelates of the realm were to be present, Abelard dared his enemies to impugn his opinions. St Bernard had been amongst those most alarmed by Abelard's teaching, and had sought those to stir up alike Pope, princes, and bishops to take measures against him. He did not readily, however, take up the gauntlet thrown down by the great hero of the schools. He professed himself a "stripling too unversed in logic to meet the giant practiced in every kind of debate." But "all were come prepared for a spectacle", and he was forced into the field. To the amazement of all, when the combatants met and all seemed ready for the intellectual fray, Abelard refused to proceed with his defense. After several passages considered to be heretical had been read from his books he made no reply, but at once appealed to Rome and left the assembly. Probably he saw enough in the character of the meeting to assure him that it formed a very different audience from those which he had been accustomed to sway by his subtlety and eloquence, and had recourse to this expedient to gain time and foil his adversaries. Bernard followed up his assault by a letter of indictment to the Pope against the heretic. The Pope responded by a sentence of condemnation, and Abelard was silenced. Soon after he found refuge at Cluny with the kindly abbot, Peter the Venerable, who brought about something of a reconciliation betwixt him and Bernard. The latter, however, never heartily forgave the heretic. He was too zealous a churchman not to see the danger there is in such a spirit as Abelard's, and the serious consequences to which it might lead.

In all things Bernard was enthusiastically devoted to the church, and it was this enthusiasm which led him at last into the chief error of his career. Bad news reached France of the progress of the Turkish arms in the East. The capture of Edessa in 1144 sent a thrill of alarm and indignation throughout Christian Europe, and the French king was urged to send forth a new army to reclaim the Ho]y Land from the triumphant infidels. The Pope was consulted, and encouraged the good work, delegating to St Bernard the office of preaching the new crusade. Weary with growing years and cares the abbot of Clairvaux seemed at first reluctant, but afterwards threw himself with all his accustomed power into the new movement, and by his marvellous eloquence kindled the crusading madness once more throughout France and Germany. Not only the French king, Louis VII., but the German emperor, Conrad III., placed himself at the head of a vast army and set out for the East by way of Constantinople. Detained there too long by the duplicity of the Greeks, and divided in counsel, the Christian armies encountered frightful hardships, and were at length either dispersed or destroyed. Utter ruin and misery followed in the wake of the wildest enthusiasm. Bernard became an object of abuse as the great preacher of a movement which had terminated so disastrously, and wrote in humility an apologetic letter to the Pope, in which the divine judgments are made as usual accountable for human folly. This and other anxieties bore heavily upon even so sanguine a spirit. Disaster abroad and heresy at home left him no peace, while his body was worn to a shadow by his fasting and labour. It was, as he said, " the season of calamities." Still to the last, with failing strength, sleepless, unable to take solid food, with limbs swollen and feeble, his spirit was unconquerable. "Whenever a great necessity called him forth," as his friend and biographer Godfrey says, "his mind conquered all his bodily infirmities, he was endowed with strength and to the astonishment of all who saw him, he could surpass even robust men in his endurance of fatigue." He continued absorbed in public affairs, and dispensed his care and advice in all directions often about the most trivial is well as the most important affairs. Finally the death of his associates and friends left him without any desire to live. He longed rather "to depart and be with Christ." To his sorrowing monks, whose earnest prayers were supposed to have assisted his partial recovery when near his end, he said, "Why do you thus detain a miserable man? Spare me. Spare me, and let me depart." He expired August 20, 1153, shortly after his disciple Pope Eugenius III.

His character appears in our brief sketch as that of a noble enthusiast, selfish in nothing save in so far as the church had become a part of himself, ardent in his sympathies and friendships, tenacious of purpose, terrible in indignation. He spared no abuse, and denounced what he deemed corruption to the Pope as frankly as to one of his own monks. He is not a thinker nor a man in advance of his age, but much of the best thought and piety of his time are sublimed in him to a sweet mystery and rapture of sentiment which has still power to touch amidst all its rhetorical exaggerations.

His writings are very numerous, consisting of epistles, sermons, and theological treatises. The best edition of his works is that of Father Mabillon, printed at Paris in 1690 in 2 vols. folio, and reprinted more than once -- finally in 1854 in 4 vols. 8vo. His life, written by his friend and disciple Godfrey, is also contained in this edition of his works. (J. T.)

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
2 avril 2011 6 02 /04 /avril /2011 15:30

source : http://www.historia.fr

 

Elle stipule qu'il est interdit de combattre pendant les jours de la semaine qui rappellent la passion du Christ, la Résurrection, l'Ascension, du premier dimanche de l'avent jusqu'au dimanche de l'Epiphanie ; la fête de la Vierge ; celles de saint Jean-Baptiste et des Apôtres. Dans les années 1020 intervient la notion de « trêve de Dieu ». En 1027, le concile de Toulouges en Roussillon rappelle que le dimanche doit être un jour de trêve générale. Puis en 1041, le concile d'Arles interdit toute forme de violence, du mercredi soir, jusqu'au lundi matin.

Le concile de Narbonne, en 1054, codifie ainsi la paix de Dieu suivant ce fil conducteur annoncé en préface : « Un chrétien qui tue un autre chrétien répand le sang du Christ. » La chevalerie est donc mise au service d'un idéal religieux, supposant de nouveaux devoirs, dont l'application permettra le passage de valeurs de charité et de justice, dans une société brutale et égoïste. La protection de l'Eglise suppose un serment. Les armes sont bénies au moment où elles sont remises au jeune chevalier, à sa majorité et accompagnées d'une oraison dont voici un exemple : « Exaucez, ô Seigneur, nos prières et bénissez de la main de Votre Majesté cette épée dont votre serviteur désire être ceint afin de pouvoir défendre et protéger les églises, les veuves, les orphelins et tous les serviteurs de Dieu contre la cruauté des païens et afin d'être l'effroi de tous ceux qui lui tendent des pièges. »

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
2 avril 2011 6 02 /04 /avril /2011 09:41

source : http://www.museeprotestant.org

 

Écrivain et théologien, il recueille à Genève la succession de Calvin.

 

Un humaniste disciple de Calvin

  

Théodore de Bèze est né à Vézelay en Bourgogne en 1519. Il fait des études littéraires et juridiques à Orléans et Paris. Il s'intéresse vivement aux idées réformées tout en initiant une brillante carrière d'homme de lettres. C'est une grave maladie qui l'amène à la Réforme (1548).

Il est alors contraint à l'exil et devient professeur de grec à Lausanne, puis professeur de théologie et pasteur à Genève. Il est le premier recteur de l'Académie que Calvin vient de fonder à Genève en 1559.

Lors de la première guerre de religion, il est aumônier de l'armée de Condé. Il dirige la délégation protestante au Colloque de Poissy (1561). Il préside le synode de la Rochelle en 1571 durant lequel la Confession de foi des Églises réformées de France est adoptée.

De retour à Genève en 1563, il succède à Calvin à la direction de l'Église de Genève et reste le fidèle continuateur de son œuvre. Il assure après lui la direction ecclésiastique et intellectuelle du mouvement réformé international.

 

Théodore de Bèze homme de lettres

  

Il compose une tragédie biblique Abraham sacrifiant en 1550, peut-être l'œuvre littéraire la plus accomplie qu'il ait laissée, œuvre qui mêle habilement l'héritage humaniste et la conscience chrétienne.

La Confession de la foi chrétienne, parue en français en 1559, puis en latin en 1560 résume de façon systématique la doctrine réformée.

En 1561, continuant l'œuvre entreprise par Clément Marot, Théodore de Bèze termine la transposition des Psaumes en vers français, qui seront ensuite mis en musique dans le Psautier de Genève.

Du droit des magistrats sur leurs sujets fait partie des ouvrages écrits par des auteurs protestants à la suite de la Saint-Barthélemy et qui légitiment une résistance constitutionnelle à l'égard d'un gouvernement devenu tyrannique. Avec cet ouvrage, Théodore de Bèze fait partie des monarchomaques.

Sa Correspondance est considérable. Elle est échangée avec les théologiens, les hommes politiques et les écrivains de l'Europe entière.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 21:58

source : http://www.historia.fr

 

Quand Clovis meurt, le 27 novembre 511, il laisse quatre fils — l’aîné, Thierry, étant né d’une concubine et les trois autres de Clotilde — qui vont se partager le royaume franc. Thierry Ier (511-533) s’installe à Metz, Clodomir (511-524) à Orléans, Childebert (511-558) à Paris et Clotaire Ier (511-561) à Soissons. Leurs règnes sont une suite de meurtres et d’atrocités, envers leur propre famille comme envers les ennemis de l’extérieur. Cependant, malgré cette barbarie, d’ailleurs commune à l’époque, ils font figure de chefs. Ils réussissent à s’emparer du royaume burgonde (534) après onze ans de luttes. Les peuples de la Germanie méridionale (Alamans, Thuringiens et Bavarois) sont eux aussi soumis en 556. Entre-temps, la Provence a été occupée (537) et les fils de Clovis interviennent encore contre les Saxons de Germanie septentrionale et en Italie du Nord (537-539) ainsi qu’en Espagne contre les Wisigoths. Dès lors, la Gaule tout entière appartient aux Francs.

Mais les fils de Clovis vont s’entretuer. Dès 524, à la mort de Clodomir sur un champ de bataille de Bourgogne, Childebert et Clotaire ont égorgé deux de ses jeunes enfants pour pouvoir se partager ses territoires (le troisième, Clodoald, futur saint Cloud, ira fonder un couvent et s’y retirera), puis ont continué à se battre entre eux. En 558, Childebert meurt sans postérité, ce qui met un terme à la lutte fratricide.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 21:41

source : http://www.historia.fr

 

Fondé en 1118 à Jérusalem par neuf chevaliers français à la tête desquels se trouvait le Champenois Hugues de Payns, l’ordre militaire des Templiers allait former, avec les Hospitaliers de Saint-Jean, l’armée permanente des États latins d’Orient. D’abord nommés « Pauvres chevaliers du Christ », les nouveaux moines-soldats prirent leur nom de Templiers lorsque Baudoin II, roi de Jérusalem, les eut installés dans l’ancien temple de Salomon. En 1128, saint Bernard fit approuver la fondation de l’ordre par le concile de Troyes et lui imposa la règle cistercienne.

Les chevaliers, tous nobles, prononçaient les vœux de pauvreté, de chasteté et d’obéissance ; en dessous d’eux, sergents et écuyers pouvaient être des roturiers. En 1188, on installa au sommet de la hiérarchie un grand maître élu, assisté du sénéchal et du maréchal de l’Ordre, mais le véritable pouvoir résidait dans les chapitres. Les Templiers se reconnaissaient à leurs manteaux de laine blanche ornés d’une croix rouge. Avec les Hospitaliers, ils se battaient contre les infidèles, bâtissaient des forteresses, protégaient les pèlerins. Ils avaient fini par jouer un rôle financier considérable. L’exploitation de leurs domaines, les dons, la confiance des possédants utilisant leurs édifices inviolables comme abris de leurs trésors, leur crédit à travers le monde leur avaient apporté une puissance financière internationale.

Après la perte de Jérusalem (1291), l’utilité militaire de l’Ordre disparut et beaucoup de critiques, jusqu’alors étouffées, se firent entendre. Le mystère des cérémonies du Temple inquiétait. On accusait les chevaliers d’impiété, d’ivrognerie, de débauche. Les établissements qu’ils avaient fondés en France étaient particulièrement prospères. Poussé par son conseiller, Nogaret, le roi Philippe le Bel décida d’abattre la puissance du Temple, tout en mettant la main sur ses trésors. Le 13 octobre 1307, il fit arrêter le grand maître Jacques de Molay et soixante chevaliers sous l’inculpation d’hérésie, d’idolâtrie, de sodomie. Torturés, ils avouèrent des crimes qu’ils n’avaient sans doute pas commis. Le pape Clément V, pressé par le roi, finit, après des années d’hésitation, par dissoudre l’Ordre (3 avril 1312). Entre-temps, des Templiers, qui avaient rétracté leurs aveux, avaient été brûlés vifs (mai 1310). Jacques de Molay subit le même sort le 19 mars 1314.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 21:39

source : http://www.historia.fr

 

Après les âpres querelles qui opposèrent Philippe le Bel au pape Boniface VIII, le roi réussit à faire élire sur le trône de saint Pierre l’archevêque de Bordeaux, Bertrand de Got, qui devint Clément V (1305). Celui-ci, sacré à Lyon, nomma un bon nombre de cardinaux français. Placé sous l’influence de Philippe le Bel , il désirait ardemment régler les vieux différends entre la monarchie française et la papauté. Au lieu de regagner Rome, il finit par se fixer dans un couvent de dominicains à Avignon , sans avoir l’intention d’y installer définitivement le siège de la papauté.

À cette époque, le désordre régnait dans la Ville éternelle. À la mort de Clément V (1314), le nombre des cardinaux français s’était multiplié. À six reprises, ceux-ci élirent un de leurs compatriotes. Ces papes craignaient de rentrer en Italie, où l’agitation persistait. Ils désiraient, d’autre part, ménager les rois de France, qui usaient de leur côté de tous les arguments pour garder la papauté en deçà des Alpes. Quant aux Avignonnais, ils se réjouissaient de voir leur ville devenir la capitale de l’Église. Sur les rives du Rhône le commerce prospérait.

Le successeur de Clément V, Jean XXII, élu à Lyon en 1316, revint à Avignon, où il choisit pour domicile le palais épiscopal. Le pape suivant, Benoît XII, décida de faire construire à Avignon un édifice, mi-monastère, mi-forteresse. Ce Palais des Papes, commencé en 1334, allait dépasser en beauté architecturale tout ce qu’avait imaginé le pontife. Après lui, Clément VI acheta Avignon à la princesse Jeanne de Naples. En Italie, les Romains se plaignaient de ce qu’ils appelaient la « trahison pontificale » et critiquaient avec force le népotisme et l’immoralité régnant à Avignon. Après Innocent VI, qui s’efforça de réduire le luxe déployé autour de lui, Urbain V décida, malgré la résistance de Charles V, de regagner Rome (1367), mais les troubles qui y régnaient le forcèrent à rentrer trois ans plus tard à Avignon. Au début de 1377, sur les instances de Catherine de Sienne, Grégoire XI résolut enfin de passer les Alpes.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 21:35

source : http://www.historia.fr

 

À la suite d’un vœu, Saint Louis décida de reprendre aux Infidèles le tombeau du Christ. Embarqué à Aigues-Mortes le 25 août 1248, il se dirigea sur l’Égypte, dans l’intention de vaincre d’abord les musulmans du Caire et de gagner ensuite la Palestine. La flotte arriva en vue de Damiette. Les Arabes attendaient les envahisseurs mais, sitôt débarqués, les Français les dispersèrent et entrèrent dans la ville (6 juin 1249). La marche sur Le Caire fut bientôt décidée. L’armée réussit à passer sur la rive est du Nil, à Mansourah, mais l’ennemi revint en force et les croisés durent rétrograder jusqu’à leur camp, où la famine et la dysenterie firent des ravages. Harcelés par les Arabes, ils durent entamer un combat au cours duquel ils furent décimés (5-6 avril). Le roi, épuisé par la maladie, fut capturé et dut signer un traité : en échange de Damiette, il fut libéré mais dut payer une grosse rançon pour ses compagnons (2 mai 1250). Ses vertus frappèrent les musulmans, qui le surnommèrent « le sultan juste ». Une fois libre, Saint Louis gagna en simple pèlerin la Palestine où il resta jusqu’à ce que la nouvelle de la mort de Blanche de Castille le forçât à repartir (avril 1254).

Cet échec n’empêcha pas le pieux roi, malgré une santé précaire, de préparer une nouvelle croisade. Son objectif était cette fois la Tunisie, dont il voulait faire une base d’opérations pour une campagne ultérieure. Partis d’Aigues-Mortes le 1er juillet 1270, les croisés parvinrent le 17 à Tunis, mais très vite la peste fit son apparition. Le roi lui-même en fut atteint. Il accepta pieusement la mort et expira le 25 août. Son fils, Philippe III le Hardi, qui l’avait accompagné, signa une trêve de dix ans avec les musulmans et rembarqua l’armée. L’ère des croisades était close et les derniers établissements français en Palestine destinés à disparaître.

> Lire l'article dans son environnemnt original

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 21:21

source : http://www.historia.fr

 

C’est l’un des événements les plus importants de la monarchie française car il fonde le succès des souverains francs et, après eux, celui des Capétiens en même temps qu’une forte puissance catholique. Il est difficile de dater la conversion de Clovis, qui dominait des tribus religieusement divisées puisque, à côté des Gallo-Romains catholiques, les Wisigoths et les Burgondes étaient ariens (hérétiques), et les Alamans et les Francs eux-mêmes, des païens

Clovis se fit baptiser entre 496 et 506 et son exemple fut suivi par l’ensemble de ses guerriers. L’influence de son épouse Clotilde fut incontestable, comme celle de saint Rémi, évêque de Reims, qui le baptisa très probablement à Noël avec, selon une tradition rapportée par Hincmar au XIe siècle, une huile venue miraculeusement du ciel, qui, conservée dans la Sainte Ampoule, servit dès lors au sacre des rois. Cet acte décisif fit du roi des Francs le seul souverain catholique de l’Occident et lui donna, de ce fait, un rôle prépondérant dans un monde où les évêques représentaient la seule force morale et la plus grande puissance économique du temps. Cet événement capital devait à la fois légitimer sa prise du pouvoir en Gaule et permettre la liquidation de l’hérésie arienne, qui menaçait alors de prévaloir.

L’Occident devenait donc chrétien et cela d’autant plus que le baptême de Clovis ne peut et ne doit être isolé d’une multitude de conversions qui s’opérèrent à l’aube du VIe siècle. Que cet acte personnel et indubitablement sincère ait été conforme à l’intérêt politique de Clovis, c’est absolument certain puisqu’il faisait du roi des Francs le défenseur du catholicisme et ralliait ainsi à sa politique toute l’Église et toutes les populations gallo-romaines, facilitant grandement ses conquêtes et sa domination. De la même manière, il est indiscutable que ce baptême était la manifestation de la christianisation de la Gaule et de l’Occident et que le baptême du roi des Francs devait se produire tôt ou tard.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article
1 avril 2011 5 01 /04 /avril /2011 21:03

source : http://www.historia.fr

 

Quatre siècles avant la première croisade, les Arabes avaient anéanti, au cours de leurs foudroyantes conquêtes du VIIe siècle, les chrétiens de Syrie, d’Égypte, d’Afrique du Nord. L’Occident rêvait de reconquérir la Terre sainte, arrachée par la violence et où des communautés chrétiennes restaient opprimées. Les pèlerinages n’avaient jamais cessé malgré les difficultés. Pour libérer les lieux saints, des expéditions militaires sont organisées par l’Église. Ceux qui partent portent une croix d’étoffe rouge cousue sur leurs vêtements — d’où le nom de croisés — et la piété s’allie en eux au goût de l’aventure et à l’espoir de s’enrichir tout en faisant leur salut. La 1re croisade est prêchée en 1095, à Clermont, par le pape Urbain II, orateur puissant, de haute taille, pour aller libérer la Terre sainte occupée par les musulmans. Cet appel déchaîne un grand enthousiasme, d’autant plus que le pape accorde aux croisés l’indulgence plénière. Les croisés arrivent, par quatre routes terrestres, à Constantinople, s’emparent de Nicée pour le compte de Byzance (1097), traversent l’Asie Mineure et parviennent devant Antioche, qu’ils prennent après un long siège.

Un an plus tard, le 15 juillet 1099, ils assaillent victorieusement Jérusalem, se livrant au pillage et au massacre pendant trois jours. Après cette victoire éclatante sur les Turcs, la côte de la Terre sainte est bientôt conquise et organisée en quatre principautés chrétiennes et féodales : le comté d’Édesse (1098-1144), la principauté d’Antioche (1098-1268), le comté de Tripoli (1109-1289) et le royaume de Jérusalem (1099-1291) dont la couronne est donnée à Godefroi de Bouillon. e la coalition.

> Lire l'article dans son environnement original

 

 

 

 

Repost 0
Published by LePontissalien - dans VIE RELIGIEUSE
commenter cet article

Présentation

  • : French Influence
  • : Cher visiteur (é)perdu, bienvenue sur le blog de French Influence. Il est question ici de la France et de son rapport au monde. Il est question de la France, pour l'amour du pays, par les yeux du monde
  • Contact